Dear Orca Clients,

Effective immediately, and in accordance with federal and local guidance, Orca Information has prepared to continue work operations . Our new hours of operations are Monday—Friday from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM and we will be closed on Saturdays. This will remain in effect until further notice as we continue monitoring the COVID-19 situation.

Our hearts go to those that have been impacted by the ripple effect of COVID-19. We are all in this together and we are looking forward to our continued partnership with you.

Sincerely,
The Orca Pod

Dear Orca Clients,

Effective immediately, and in accordance with federal and local guidance, Orca Information has prepared to continue work operations . Our new hours of operations are Monday—Friday from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM and we will be closed on Saturdays. This will remain in effect until further notice as we continue monitoring the COVID-19 situation.

Our hearts go to those that have been impacted by the ripple effect of COVID-19. We are all in this together and we are looking forward to our continued partnership with you.

Sincerely,
The Orca Pod

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Former Wells Fargo Employees Sue

Eleven former Wells Fargo employees have sued the bank over being fired based on background checks showing minor criminal violations that in some cases were decades old or expunged from their records.

The bank  conducted the background checks after a 2008 federal law did not allow banks and mortgage companies to employ people with criminal violations involving dishonesty.

Pursuant to the Background Checks Project, Wells Fargo abruptly fired thousands of exemplary employees, some of whom had worked for Wells Fargo for decades and were approaching retirement, others who had just received promotions or had bonuses forthcoming,” the suit said. “No other FDIC-insured banking institution engaged in mass employee termination under the auspices of ‘compliance.’

Wells Fargo stood by its decision to fire the affected employees.

OAKLAND, CA (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

 

Several of the plaintiffs allege that they were hired after disclosing their criminal convictions and told that it would not affect their employment with the San Francisco-based bank.

Some of the plaintiffs said criminal charges never resulted in a conviction. Others said that the conviction stemmed from misdemeanors or, as one plaintiff put it, a “hairbrush incident,” previously disclosed to Wells that had occurred 30 years prior to her firing from the bank in 2012, according to the suit.

 

 

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON OUR EMPLOYMENT SCREENING SERVICES,

CONTACT US AT:  ORCA INFORMATION, DANIELLE,

800-341-0022, EXT. 1111,

Danielle@orcainfo-com.comwww.orcainformation.com

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